The Prepper Family’s Summer Bucket List

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The Prepper Family Summer Bucket List via The Survival Mom

Summer is upon us, and that usually means more time spent together as a family when the kids are out of school. Even homeschool moms take a few breaks in the summer. This time of year is a great time to hone your family’s survival skills.

I’ve put together a summer bucket list for the prepper family. See how many things your family can check off this summer. Have fun with it and get your family involved!

Food

Emergency drills

  • If you live in the right location, do a Tornado drill
  • Plan and execute an emergency Fire drill (Check the batteries in smoke and CO detectors.)
  • Do an Evacuation drill (change it up with 1-hour, 30-minute and 15-minute notice evacuation drills.) This handbook provides all you need to know about getting ready for evacuations.
  • Use power at home for a full day and night.
  • Only use generator power for 6 hours.
  • “There’s no toilet paper!” (Cloth wipes, anyone?)
  • No running water for a full day and night. (Do not skip bathing or washing dishes!)
  • Minimize water down the drain for a day – reuse dish/bath/pool water in the garden or for plants
  • Do a Robbery/home invasion drill (Include several with the intruder coming in different doors/windows.)
  • Spend a day unplugged from electronic devices to see how your family does with no internet connection.

Put your supplies to work

  • Update your emergency binder. (Ask kids what important papers or pictures they might want to put in the binder.)
  • Check clothing and shoe sizes in vehicles, bug-out-bags, and tornado/storm shelter.
  • Review your home library.
  • Add money to your cash stash by holding a yard sale.
  • Buy a tarp if you don’t have one, and then brainstorm all the ways that a tarp could be useful in an emergency.
  • Rotate any gas/diesel you have stored and refill right away.
  • Check expiration dates on any bleach/sanitation supplies and restock.
  • Reorganize garden tools.

Learn or improve skills

  • Go camping. (Can your family live together for long in one tent? Reorganize the gear when you get home.)
  • Go hiking. (Figure out what weight each family member can comfortably carry in a backpack.)
  • Go fishing. (Try finding your own bait rather than buying any.)
  • Go biking. (Do your children know how to patch a bike tire?)
  • Have children start a fire from scratch.
  • Wash clothes by hand.
  • Go geocaching.
  • Have the kids use a paper map to get from point A to point B. (If you’re ambitious, create your own family Amazing Race.)
  • Build something functional from scratch with wood, a handsaw, nails, and a hammer.
  • Make your own bug spray.
  • Make your own sunscreen.
  • Make homemade laundry soap.
  • Hone shooting skills at the range (Make sure to keep ammo stocked up.)
  • Sew something simple without using a sewing machine. (Learn a new stitch if you already know how to sew.)
  • Buy a new piece of cast iron and learn how to season it.
  • Find 10 local birds and learn about them.
  • Select 10 local insects or small animals and draw some of your favorites.
  • Identify at least 10 different trees that grow in your area.
  • Sharpen tools and knives.
  • Earn certifications in first aid and CPR. (Discuss defibrillators and epi-pens, too.)
  • Have everyone try out a fire extinguisher.
  • Try starting a fire without a lighter or match.
  • Learn to tie 5 different knots.
  • Plan evacuation routes on a map and then actually drive those routes to become familiar with them.

Practice skills in different scenarios

  • Spend a day living out of your car. (Take notes on what you wish you had.)
  • Walk home from work. Bonus points if you can ably carry your emergency kit/bug out bag.
  • Show the kids how to walk home from school safely.
  • Do some summer school. (If you don’t homeschool, consider it a practice run if you should ever need to.)
  • Play the “What If …” game.
  • Discuss social media safety rules.

Fun and educational activities for your family summer bucket list

  • Go scavenging for supplies at garage sales (Among other things, look for reference books, camping gear, cast iron.)
  • Play board games, so you know the rules before you lose power and those games become a major form of entertainment.
  • Learn new card games. (Is there a deck of cards in your vehicle or bug-out-bag?)
  • Work on a family history tree and talk about family medical history.
  • Learn to play chess.
  • Do craft time using supplies from the recycle bin.
  • Read classic literature.
  • Make paracord bracelets.
  • See how many ways you can use a kiddie pool.
  • Find a local history or reenactment group and attend one of their events. (Get tips from the actors on how life was lived before electricity.)
  • Visit a local history museum or county historical society to see how people grew food by hand in your area.
  • Practice memorization with children — stories, emergency addresses, and numbers, directions, songs.
  • Relax and go on a day trip or vacation. Discuss how you would handle some emergency situations en route and at your destination.
  • Write letters. Can your children read and write in cursive? Can they address an envelope and put a stamp in the correct corner?
  • Start learning a foreign language as a family. DuoLingo and Mango Languages are 2 free websites that teach foreign languages. Get their apps on your phones, too!
  • Get to know your neighbors. Take them cookies or host a neighborhood cookout.
  • Perform random acts of kindness.

After you check each item off your list, make sure to talk about what you learned as a family. Take notes on what worked, lessons learned, things to do better next time, and if there is anything to add to your survival supplies. Take pictures and create a photo book of the summer adventures as something you can look back on as a family. Creating a summer bucket list could be the start of a new family tradition. Don’t forget to add your own items to the list.

Click HERE for a printable version of this list!

Want even more ideas for a fun summer?

The Prepper Family's Summer Bucket List via The Survival Mom

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Sarah Anne Carter is a writer and reader. She grew up all over the world as a military brat and is now putting down roots with her family in Ohio. Visit her at SarahAnneCarter.com

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