The Survival Mom » Preparedness http://thesurvivalmom.com Helping moms worry less & enjoy life! Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:08:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Product Review: The Abeego Wrap, something a little different for your emergency kits http://thesurvivalmom.com/product-review-abeego-wrap-something-little-different-emergency-kits/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=product-review-abeego-wrap-something-little-different-emergency-kits http://thesurvivalmom.com/product-review-abeego-wrap-something-little-different-emergency-kits/#comments Mon, 14 Apr 2014 16:35:11 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13625 Thanks to Earth Easy, I’ve been playing around with a new product called the Abeego Wrap. The Abeego Wrap is a natural alternative to plastic wraps, such as Saran, and plastic storage bags. The Abeego is a flat piece that Read More

The post Product Review: The Abeego Wrap, something a little different for your emergency kits by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

abeego-multi-wrap-webThanks to Earth Easy, I’ve been playing around with a new product called the Abeego Wrap. The Abeego Wrap is a natural alternative to plastic wraps, such as Saran, and plastic storage bags.

The Abeego is a flat piece that resembles canvas, but it’s made of beeswax, jojoba oil, hemp, cotton, and tree resin. It can be wrapped and fitted around any number of objects. In my kitchen, it became the designated onion-wrapper whenever we had an unused piece of onion. In spite of this use, the Abeego didn’t retain the smell or flavor of onion and we used it with other foods.

Because it’s so sturdy, I expect mine to last for a very long time.

I’ve been using the Abeego Wrap, which is, incidentally, very attractive in an all-natural way. Mine has purple stitching on one side, two round purple buttons, and a purple cord that can be used to help secure the Wrap. Abeego Flats are also available and are demonstrated in this video:

In your emergency kit, the Abeego could be used to wrap anything damp, partially eaten food, or used as a sort of envelope to enclose several smaller items. It could be slipped into a diaper bag, backpack, or purse, and would be helpful to have when camping. Think of it as a Zip-Loc bag or a roll of Saran Wrap that you can use over and over and over.

Wash the Abeego with warm, soapy water; it’s not dishwasher safe.

For more product reviews, click here.

This article contains affiliate links. Thanks for supporting The Survival Mom blog, newsletter, and podcast network with your purchases.

 

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Product Review: The Abeego Wrap, something a little different for your emergency kits by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/product-review-abeego-wrap-something-little-different-emergency-kits/feed/ 3
Last week’s Greatest Hits on The Survival Mom Radio Network http://thesurvivalmom.com/last-weeks-greatest-hits-survival-mom-radio-network/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=last-weeks-greatest-hits-survival-mom-radio-network http://thesurvivalmom.com/last-weeks-greatest-hits-survival-mom-radio-network/#comments Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:00:00 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13256 Last week I had the opportunity to interview 2 fascinating guests, taking a look at 2 potential worst case scenarios: a mini Ice Age and a nuclear event. David Archibald is the author of Twilight of Abundance and has a Read More

The post Last week’s Greatest Hits on The Survival Mom Radio Network by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Last week I had the opportunity to interview 2 fascinating guests, taking a look at 2 potential worst case scenarios: a mini Ice Age and a nuclear event.

Worst Case ScenarioDavid Archibald is the author of Twilight of Abundance and has a varied background as a scientist in oil exploration, energy, and climate science. He bases his climate research on a number of factors, but solar activity is his main focus in this interview. We talked about how our sun is at one of its lowest levels of activity in many decades and how similar periods in the past led to ice ages. He also addresses global warming and why he believes it’s one of the biggest hoaxes in history.

Click here for the interview —> http://bit.ly/1emNwrh

My second interview was with Janet Liebsch who, with her husband, is the author of It’s a Disaster…and what are you going to do about it? This all-purpose guide to multiple disasters was one of the first I read when I began learning about preparedness. I wanted to talk with Janet about potential nuclear disasters because she constantly has her ear to the ground where current disasters and research is concerned. In this interview we discuss Fukushima and try to separate fact from fiction and in the second half, she shares tips for surviving a nuclear event.

To listen to my interview with Janet, click here —> http://bit.ly/QYoJVq

Here are links to those 2 shows as well as all the others in our network. Give a listen to a new host this week! You just might find a new favorite!


© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Last week’s Greatest Hits on The Survival Mom Radio Network by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/last-weeks-greatest-hits-survival-mom-radio-network/feed/ 0
Medical basics: Wound infections http://thesurvivalmom.com/medical-basics-wound-infections/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=medical-basics-wound-infections http://thesurvivalmom.com/medical-basics-wound-infections/#comments Sat, 05 Apr 2014 18:12:54 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13455 Guest post by by Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net As a physician, I have on occasion dealt with infected wounds, sometimes from injury and also after surgical procedures. In a survival setting, most wounds will be contaminated Read More

The post Medical basics: Wound infections by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Guest post by by Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net

image by TimmyGUNZ

image by TimmyGUNZ

As a physician, I have on occasion dealt with infected wounds, sometimes from injury and also after surgical procedures. In a survival setting, most wounds will be contaminated with debris, dirt, and bacteria.  Therefore, anyone who will be medically responsible after a disaster occurs may expect to deal with wound infections.  The ability to recognize and treat infected injuries will be an important one to have in times of trouble.

 

Recognizing a wound infection

 

The human body is a miracle of engineering.  Our immune system probably nips many contaminations in the bud, but a body under stress sometimes can’t effectively fight germs. This explains why certain people, such as diabetics, are so prone to wound infections.  The elderly are especially susceptible.
Your skin is its own ecosystem, with bacteria that naturally live there, such as Staph. Epidermidis. When the immune system fails to recognize and fight an infection, even “normal” skin bacteria can invade deep wounds and cause serious damage.  Delays in healing and even invasion of the circulation can lead to life-threatening conditions.

 

To identify an infected wound, look for these signs:

 

  •         Redness around the edges which spreads over time
  •         Swelling around the wound, sometimes appearing shiny
  •         Warmth in the area of the wound compared to other parts of the body
  •         Pain out of proportion to the size of the wound
  •         Drainage of fluid or pus from the wound, which can have a foul odor
  •         Lack of healing over time

 

Red, swollen, warm skin around the wound is referred to as “Cellulitis”.  If the wound is deep enough, the bone and its marrow can become infected, which is known as “Osteomyelitis”.  Once the bacteria invades the circulation, the entire body is affected. We called this “Septocemia” or “Sepsis”. Septic patients or those with osteomyelitis commonly have fevers to go along with the above-listed signs and symptoms.

Preventing Wound Infections

 

Proper wound care and frequent dressing changes are the cornerstones to preventing wound infections. In the healing process, new cells fill in an open wound by a process known as “Granulation”.  These new cells need a moist environment for rapid growth, and so any deep wound should have a sterile moist (not soaking wet) bandage.
Although  iodine or saline solutions are often used to moisten the bandage, recent evidence suggests that sterilized drinkable water is probably as good or better. The moist bandage is then covered with a dry dressing. Oftentimes, triple antibiotic cream is applied to the skin (only) before taping the dressing into place.  Mark the bandage with the time and date it was placed.
Wound dressings should be changed at least once or twice daily. Sanitary precautions such as hand-washing, sterilized instruments, and glove usage will significantly decrease the risks of infection.

 

Treating Wound Infections

 

The most common cause of serious wound infections is the bacteria Staph. Aureus, although Group A Strep, Pseudomonas, and various intestinal bacteria are other micro-organisms commonly seen. An especially troublesome form of Staph. Aureus has shown resistant to the usual antibiotics used.  This is called Methicillin Resistant Staph. Aureus, better known to the public as MRSA.  Once only seen in hospital-based infections, this resistant micro-organism is now seen in the general population.

 

It’s important to not let a wound infection become severe because these are difficult to cure without IV antibiotics. For mild to moderate infections, consider some of the following antibiotics:

 

  •         Bactrim (Bird-Sulfa)
  •         Clindamycin (Fish-Cin)
  •         Doxycycline (Bird-Biotic)
  •         Cephalexin (Fish-Flox)

 

To find out more about these antibiotics and othersas well as dosages, and indications, check out our series of articles on the subject at doomandbloom.net or check out a print or digital copy of the Second Edition of our book “The Survival Medicine Handbook”.

 

There is more to prevention and treatment of wound infections than was covered in this article.  What tips do YOU have for dealing with this important issue?

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Medical basics: Wound infections by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/medical-basics-wound-infections/feed/ 11
How to be as scary as hell in less than 5 seconds http://thesurvivalmom.com/scary-hell-less-5-seconds/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scary-hell-less-5-seconds http://thesurvivalmom.com/scary-hell-less-5-seconds/#comments Sat, 05 Apr 2014 13:40:35 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13437 As a new college graduate, I toiled for five long years in the underbelly of public education: the middle school. Although I loved my job and students, I was a mere 7 or 8 years older than some of my Read More

The post How to be as scary as hell in less than 5 seconds by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
image by Sarah G.

image by Sarah G.

As a new college graduate, I toiled for five long years in the underbelly of public education: the middle school. Although I loved my job and students, I was a mere 7 or 8 years older than some of my students and more than a few inches shorter.

I had to quickly learn how to take control of a situation and let every student know that this short little teacher, fresh out of college, could handle anything. I learned how to give The Stare.

Now, you may think that giving someone, “the stink eye”, or, “the evil eye”, is a matter of scrunching up your face, squinting  your eyes, and curling your lip. In fact, to truly scare the hell out of someone with just a look, it’s a matter of doing none of that.

Instead, learn to relax every facial muscle.

You do this naturally when you’re laying down resting or sleeping. Every muscle in your face is completely relaxed. Now, just learn to relax those same muscles quickly while you’re standing up.

Practice in front of a mirror. You’ll know you’ve got it right when you have “dead eyes.” Lower your chin just a tad for an even more threatening, maniacal look.

I’ve done this with my kids on a number of occasions and it completely freaks them out.  My daughter tells me I look like a zombie.

It’s a lot easier to maintain this expression for a long period of time than it is to maintain a sneer, squint, or face scrunch for those times when you need a prolonged stare to get your message across.

If you ever have to confront someone because you feel threatened, this is the look you want to have on your face: devoid of expression, scary as hell.

Remember, every muscle has to be relaxed. This takes practice but after a while, you’ll be able to switch from your normal facial expression to this one in a matter of a second or two.

When you think you’ve perfected this new skill, try it out on someone you love and report back to us their reaction.

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post How to be as scary as hell in less than 5 seconds by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/scary-hell-less-5-seconds/feed/ 15
DIY Survival: Make a Buddy Burner http://thesurvivalmom.com/diy-survival-make-buddy-burner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=diy-survival-make-buddy-burner http://thesurvivalmom.com/diy-survival-make-buddy-burner/#comments Fri, 04 Apr 2014 08:05:24 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13438 By contributing writer, Jim Cobb. There are many ways to heat food during an grid-down emergency.  Most of them, though, such as gas grills, rocket stoves, and camp stoves, aren’t suitable for indoor use.  This can be a problem given Read More

The post DIY Survival: Make a Buddy Burner by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Buddy Burner

By contributing writer, Jim Cobb.

There are many ways to heat food during an grid-down emergency.  Most of them, though, such as gas grills, rocket stoves, and camp stoves, aren’t suitable for indoor use.  This can be a problem given that many emergencies that cause the grid to go down are weather related…the type of weather where you really don’t want to be standing outside and flipping burgers on the grill.

Buddy burners are a cool DIY project that give you an excellent tool for heating food indoors.  Granted, you won’t be preparing Thanksgiving dinner with one but they work quite well for warming a can of soup or stew, as well as heating water for coffee or tea.

To make a Buddy Burner, you’ll need the following:

  • Corrugated cardboard
  • A box cutter or sharp knife
  • An empty and clean tuna or cat food can
  • A pile of old crayons or broken candles
  • An empty and clean soup can

Start by having your kids peel the paper off the old crayons or breaking the candles into small chunks.  While they’re doing that, take a small pot, fill it with a couple inches of water, and start it heating on the stove.

Put the wax from the crayons or candles into the soup can, filling it about halfway or so.  Place the can into the hot water, keeping the burner low.  You don’t really need the water to boil, just at a simmer.  What you’ve done here is create a primitive double boiler.  The water will heat and melt the wax, while the can prevents everything from getting messy.  Put one of your kids in charge of stirring the melting wax with a twig you picked up outside while you work on the other parts of this project.

Using the box cutter or knife, cut the corrugated cardboard into strips.  The width of the strips should be just slightly less than the depth of the tuna can.  Also, the cardboard should be cut across the corrugation, meaning along the long sides of each strip you should be able to see through the small “tubes” of paper to the other side.  I wish I could give you an exact measurement of how many inches of strips you’ll need but it varies.  Safe to say, though, you’ll need more than you probably think.

Begin placing the cardboard into the tuna can, wrapping the strips along the inner walls.  Be careful as the inside rim of the can may be sharp.  Keep adding strips, going around and around in ever smaller circles, until the entire can is filled with the cardboard.  When filled, looking down into the can you’ll see nothing but what appears to be a spiral of small holes.

By now, the wax should be completely melted.  Using an oven mitt because the can may be hot, pour the melted wax into the tuna can, filling all of those little holes in the cardboard.  If you run out of wax before the tuna can is full, just melt some more and add to it.

Let the buddy burner sit for a while to allow the wax to cool and harden.

To use, you simply light a match and use it to light the wax.  I’ve found if I hold a lit match just a bit above the wax, letting the wax melt a bit, then placing the match right onto that puddle works well.  It doesn’t take long before you’ll have a good flame rising up from the burner.

Now, you can’t just place your soup pot directly on the burner, of course, as that will smother the flame (not to mention get melted wax all over the bottom of the pot).  What I do is grab either a couple of small bricks or a few large rocks and bring them inside.  Placing the bricks on either side of the burner, or putting the rocks in a triangle around it, gives you a place to rest your pot, suspending it above the flame.  The buddy burner will burn for a long time, plenty long enough for a pot of soup or to boil water.

To extinguish the flame after you’re done cooking, take a square of aluminum foil and crimp it down over the top of the burner.  Alternatively, you could plate a pot lid over it.

 

Jim  Cobb is a Disaster Readiness Consultant and author of Prepper’s Home Defense, The Prepper’s Complete Book of Disaster Readiness, and Prepper’s Long-Term Survival Guide. His websites are Survival Weekly and Disaster Prep Consultants.

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post DIY Survival: Make a Buddy Burner by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/diy-survival-make-buddy-burner/feed/ 8
A Single Survival Mom’s Essential Tool Kit http://thesurvivalmom.com/supplies-specifically-single-survival-mom/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=supplies-specifically-single-survival-mom http://thesurvivalmom.com/supplies-specifically-single-survival-mom/#comments Wed, 02 Apr 2014 08:28:05 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13418 Guest post by Kris A.  My imagined scenarios for potential problems have always had one assumption in common: my husband would be right beside me sharing the workload.  But last year he fell off a roof and fractured his spine Read More

The post A Single Survival Mom’s Essential Tool Kit by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Guest post by Kris A. 

My imagined scenarios for potential problems have always had one assumption in common: my husband would be right beside me sharing the workload.  But last year he fell off a roof and fractured his spine while attaching a tarp to the roof.

tool box picmonkeyHe fully recovered within a year, but that really woke me up to a dismal contingent:  What if he was sick, injured, or didn’t make it home right away?  Could I really do the day-to-day business of providing for two kids on my own?  I hope I never have to find out.  But if I had to, what simple tools could I procure now to make that a little easier?  Here are some preps  I’ve added with that in mind:

LED head lamp—Doing dishes in the dark? Searching the basement for preps during a power outage? Soooo much easier if you have both hands free. (And the kids can actually help instead of just holding the flashlight!)  Better yet, they only get to wear the headlamp if they’re directly involved in the task.  I can hear them begging to help already.

Wallet-friendly multi-tool—After “American Blackout” showed kids stranded in the elevator, I realized my awesome bug-out bag would do me no good in the trunk; I needed more in my purse.  Then I found a multi-tool that fits in my wallet just like a credit card.  Lots of uses and virtually no weight, husband not required.  And another lightweight addition…

Solar-powered flashlight—I clipped it to the purse strap so it doesn’t take up any room, and it gets sporadic sunlight.  No batteries necessary. E-bay and Amazon also haves several key chain varieties, but I liked this one.

Staple gun—If you had to quickly secure a tarp to your roof or black-out curtains to your windows, I think this would come in pretty handy.  I picked one up for less than ten bucks and then bought an extra box of staples for about $3.  I like that it doesn’t take a lot of muscle to use it, too.

Knife sharpener—Hubby usually takes care of the tools, and we sort of assumed I would be handling most of the food preparation in dire circumstances.  Those meat knives are my tools, and I want them in tip-top condition.  I figured I’d better be able to sharpen them myself.

Zip ties—I’ve already used these to reinforce the chicken pen and the garden fence.  If I’m fending for the family on my own, this might be like having an extra set of hands around to help me “hold it all together.”

Spray paint—If I need to conceal something in a hurry, signal for help, mark belongings for each child, color-code preps, or leave a permanent message behind, this should do the trick.  What could be easier than one-handed application?

Work gloves—I’m almost ashamed to admit I didn’t already have these.  But these delicate hands are not accustomed to chopping wood or carrying heavy loads.  And if I only had my two hands, a couple of fists full of blisters could be a major catastrophe.  I think I’ll hide them, though, until I absolutely can’t talk my way out of using them.

Wheels—Whether it’s a wheelbarrow, a dolly, or the kids’ Radio Flyer, I would definitely need help lugging around firewood and buckets of hand-pumped water from the well.  Maybe I should get some weightlifting equipment in the meantime.

5-Hour Energy—I hate this stuff. I used it once on a drive-through-the-night-while-the-kids-are-sleeping vacation, and I hated that “buzzed” feeling.  But if I’m the only security detail—or even if hubby is around and we’re taking turns doing night watch—I’ll definitely need help staying awake.  Sam’s sells it by the case, and I’ll never be tempted to open it prematurely.

I have so much respect for you single moms who do it yourself on a daily basis.  Please share your wisdom by posting a comment below.  What tools and/or supplies would you add to this list?

 

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post A Single Survival Mom’s Essential Tool Kit by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/supplies-specifically-single-survival-mom/feed/ 11
13 Creative & Healthy Uses for Thieves Oil http://thesurvivalmom.com/33-ways-use-thieves-oil/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=33-ways-use-thieves-oil http://thesurvivalmom.com/33-ways-use-thieves-oil/#comments Tue, 01 Apr 2014 09:41:51 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13399 Surely there aren’t very many essential oil blends that have more impressive bragging rights than Thieves Oil. After all, how many oils claim to have been concocted during the years of the Black Plague, protecting their users from the deadly Read More

The post 13 Creative & Healthy Uses for Thieves Oil by appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Thieves OilSurely there aren’t very many essential oil blends that have more impressive bragging rights than Thieves Oil. After all, how many oils claim to have been concocted during the years of the Black Plague, protecting their users from the deadly pandemic that killed at least 75 million people?

The legend behind Thieves Oil is that a group of actual thieves covered themselves with a mixture of cinnamon, clove, and rosemary oils, which protected them as they stole valuables from the dead bodies of plague victims. Fast forward several hundred years, and Thieves Oil is now a proprietary blend from Young Living that has been shown in laboratory tests to effectively kill bacteria.

Here are just  few of the ways Thieves Oil can be used:

1.  Rub diluted* on the bottoms of feet for extra protection, especially during winter.  Why the soles of the feet?

  • The skin on the soles is the least sensitive location on the body, which means that most people will be able to apply oils there without any adverse reactions.
  • Some of the largest pores on the body are found on the soles of feet. Applying essential oils here means they will be absorbed more quickly.

2.  Put 2–3 drops on a dryer sheet to freshen laundry.

3.  If your family tends to share sicknesses, diffuse Thieves oil each day and apply it, diluted, to the soles of everyone’s feet before they go to bed at night.

4.  Drop on stubborn adhesives, such as glue and chewing gum, to remove from surfaces.

5.  Drop 4–5 drops on a tissue and attach to an air vent to freshen a hotel room. If you travel a lot, consider packing a small diffuser. I did this when we were staying in a hotel when we first arrived in Texas on our cross-country move.

6.  Diffuse for 24–48 hours straight to eliminate household mold.

7.  Thieves oil can also be ingested directly by adding a drop or two to a glass of water or almond milk, or sprinkling on a slice of bread or serving of rice.

8.  Add a few drops of Thieves oil to your homemade household cleaners for an extra boost against bacteria and mold.

9.  After someone has been sick, spray their bedding, pillows, and sickroom with either Thieves Spray or make your own spray by adding a few drops of the oil to a cup of distilled water.

10.  Mix a drop with a tablespoon of water, gargle, and swallow for a sore throat.

11. Apply to bee and wasp stings to neutralize the toxin and relieve pain.

12. Make a hot toddy with warm water, honey to taste, and a drop or two of Thieves oil for anyone in the family who is ill or is starting to come down with something.

13. Mix a few drops with a quarter cup of baking soda to use as a bathtub scrub.

There are many, many other uses for Thieves oil, and if you’re just starting to explore the world of essential oils, this oil is a good one for any starter kit because of its versatility and antibacterial properties. You can order Young Living Thieves oil by visiting my Young Living website.

 

* Thieves Oil blend is a strong blend and should be diluted with a carrier oil if applying anywhere on the body other than the soles of the feet. Add 2-3 drops of the oil to a tablespoon or two of vegetable oil, sweet almond oil, coconut oil, or olive oil. Use refined coconut oil if you want to avoid the coconut scent.

Disclaimer: After using essential oils for the past 3 years, I decided to take the plunge and become a distributor with Young Living, since all of the oils I had been using are Young Living oils. Visit my Young Living page here, and if you would like to buy your own oils at a discount, you can become a wholesale member yourself by clicking on “Sign Up Here.”

© 2014, . All rights reserved.

The post 13 Creative & Healthy Uses for Thieves Oil by appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/33-ways-use-thieves-oil/feed/ 0
Super-Mega Spring Giveaway: Sun Oven, Excalibur, Goal Zero, & more! http://thesurvivalmom.com/super-mega-spring-giveaway-sun-oven-excalibur-goal-zero/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=super-mega-spring-giveaway-sun-oven-excalibur-goal-zero http://thesurvivalmom.com/super-mega-spring-giveaway-sun-oven-excalibur-goal-zero/#comments Mon, 31 Mar 2014 18:56:09 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13411 Prepared Bloggers, a group of bloggers in the survival/preparedness niche, has teamed up with some of our favorite companies and because of their generosity, we’re able to offer you these mega giveaway prizes. This is the biggest group giveaway we’ve Read More

The post Super-Mega Spring Giveaway: Sun Oven, Excalibur, Goal Zero, & more! by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

biggestgiveawayeverPrepared Bloggers, a group of bloggers in the survival/preparedness niche, has teamed up with some of our favorite companies and because of their generosity, we’re able to offer you these mega giveaway prizes. This is the biggest group giveaway we’ve ever offered!

The All American SunOven from Sun Oven (APV $399) 

The All American Sun Oven is your off-grid solution to cooking. Let the sun bake, broil, dehydrate or cook for you.  Your sun oven will be delivered with a preparedness and dehydrating accessory package which includes:

  • New SUN OVEN® eCookbook & Emergency Preparedness CD featuring 600 recipes, hundreds of pictures, video clips and much more which has been developed by Cook’n, the award winning and #1 best-selling recipe organizer.
  • Multi-Level Dehydrating & Baking Rack Set (set of 3 racks w/1 roll parchment paper)
  • Two Easy Stack Pots w/interchangeable enamel and a glass lids
  • Multi-Fuel Water Pasteurizing Indicator (WAPI). Highly recommended by The Survival Mom.
  • Two Loaf Pans

The Excalibur 9-Tray Dehydrator (Model #3926TCDB) from Excalibur (APV $319)

The Excalibur Dehydrator is highly sought after for it’s large size (9-15”x15” trays), adjustable temperature and 26-hour timer that allows you to set it and forget it.  Dry fruits and vegetables, meats for jerky or make your own granola as well as use it for arts and crafts. The possibilities are endless.  Included with the Excalibur Dehydrator are 9 ultra paraflexx sheets and a copy of the Preserve It Naturally book.

The Goal Zero Yeti 150Solar Generator Kit from Goal Zero (APV $399)

As described on Goal Zero’s website, the Goal Zero Yeti 150 Solar Generator Kit is “a plug-and-play generator for emergencies, camping, or wherever you need power.” Consider it your portable mini-powerhouse—a gas-free source of portable power to keep lights, phones and laptops powered on through any situation. (APV $399)

 Five $50 Gift Certificates from Discount Mylar Bags (APV$50)

Mylar bags, Lifestraws, oxygen absorbers, Tattler and Gamma Lids. These are just some of the food storage supplies you’ll be able to buy with a $50 gift certificate to Discount Mylar Bags.  (APV $50)

Also, the owners of Discount Mylar Bags are proud to introduce ShieldPro Flexible Packaging (http://mylarbags.com/). A wholesale website for preparedness and food storage store owners. They offer the best wholesale prices on Mylar bags, sealers and oxygen absorbers.

Ten JarBoxes from JarBox (5 Pint Size and 5 Quart Size)

Keep your wide mouth or regular pint size canning jars safe, clean and organized with these specially designed plastic totes.  Pint size tote measures 18.25”x13.13”x2.75 and is great for transporting or storing your canned goods. Specially designed plastic totes keep your wide mouth or regular quart size canning jars clean, safe and organized.  Quart size tote measures 20”x14.50”x2.75” and is great for transporting or storing your canned goods.

The fine print…

There will be 4 lucky winners:

  • 1st winner drawn receives the All American Sun Oven plus a pint and a quart size JarBox
  • 2nd winner drawn receives the Excalibur Dehydrator plus a pint and quart size JarBox
  • 3rd winner drawn receives the Goal Zero Solar Generator Kit plus a pint and quart size JarBox
  • 4th winner drawn receives all five $50 gift certificates to Discount Mylar Bags, plus two pint size JarBoxes and two quart size JarBoxes!

The giveaway begins Monday, March 31, 2014 and ends on Monday, April 7, 2014 at 11:59 PM EST.

The winner will be notified by email on Tuesday, April 8th and must respond within 24 hours or a new winner will be drawn.

You must be 18 years old or older and a legal resident of the US to enter.  No purchase necessary and void where prohibited by law.

A HUGE THANK YOU to our sponsors for making this giveaway possible: Sun Oven, Excalibur, Goal Zero, Discount Mylar Bags, and JarBox. 

Now start entering the giveaway!

Enter the giveaway below for your chance to win.

Fill out the Rafflecopter form by signing in with your Facebook account or email address.  (We’ll need this info to contact you if you’re the winner.)

Start by clicking Easy Entry for Everyone (no social media account is required for this option). After that, each +1 you click is another entry to win.  Good luck!!
a Rafflecopter giveaway

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Super-Mega Spring Giveaway: Sun Oven, Excalibur, Goal Zero, & more! by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/super-mega-spring-giveaway-sun-oven-excalibur-goal-zero/feed/ 27
Got the earthquake jitters? This list of 23 tips will help you prepare and survive http://thesurvivalmom.com/got-earthquake-jitters-list-23-tips-will-help-prepare-survive/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=got-earthquake-jitters-list-23-tips-will-help-prepare-survive http://thesurvivalmom.com/got-earthquake-jitters-list-23-tips-will-help-prepare-survive/#comments Tue, 18 Mar 2014 18:25:11 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=13337 Was yesterday’s quake near Los Angeles a one-time-only incident or could it be a foreshock to something much bigger? Either way, use this list to prepare, and download this Red Cross app for all kinds of earthquake alerts and survival Read More

The post Got the earthquake jitters? This list of 23 tips will help you prepare and survive by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

23 earthquake survival tips 225x225Was yesterday’s quake near Los Angeles a one-time-only incident or could it be a foreshock to something much bigger? Either way, use this list to prepare, and download this Red Cross app for all kinds of earthquake alerts and survival information.

Fore more information, take “Earthquake Basics: Science, Risk, and Mitigation,” from FEMA’s online Emergency Management Institute.

1. Keep inexpensive hard hats handy to protect your head, and your children’s heads, from falling items, including anything hanging on your walls and sitting on shelves. When the earth shakes, everything shakes!

2. Get in the habit of keeping a pair of shoes next to each bed. Cuts and splinters in the feet are one of the most common post-earthquake injuries.

3. I recommend a pair of Crocs-style shoes as  emergency shoes, especially if they have a furry or padded liner. They’re quick to slip on,  oversized—so it takes a while for kids to outgrow them—and wide enough to allow for a pair of heavy socks.

4. Keep a pair of eyeglasses in a secured spot near your bed. If a quake occurs in the middle of the night, you’ll need to see where you’re going.

5. Packed emergency kits are a necessity, since a quake can leave you homeless in a matter of minutes. Have them stored right by the exit door to your home. You might not have time to track them down.

6. Teach your kids the Red Cross earthquake survival technique: “Drop, Cover, and Hold On.”  This is safer than standing in a doorway, which may or may not have structural integrity.

7. Learn and teach “Drop, Cover, and Hold On” even if you don’t live in earthquake country. Earthquakes have been happening in some really diverse places lately, so don’t assume you’re 100% earthquake safe just because you don’t live in earthquake country.

8. Inspect your home for construction and repair issues that will only worsen with an earthquake, such as a cracked foundation or a damaged roof. Take care of repairs now, if possible.

9. Cut down tree branches that are near power lines. In an earthquake, these branches often fall on the power lines, causing them to snap.

10. Know how to shut off the water and gas supplies into your home and where the shut-off  valves are located. Make sure to have the correct tools on hand to do the job and that everyone in the house knows how to do this.

11. Keep an LED flashlight or a headlamp in a secure spot next to every bed.

12. Keep a spare set of keys by your bed, in case your other set is inaccessible or can’t be found due to fallen debris.

13. Have a lanyard that holds a simple photo I.D., including the address and phone number, for each member of the family. Keep each person’s lanyard by his or her bed, either in a drawer or hanging from a bedpost. Instruct kids  to put theirs on in case of an earthquake or another emergency.

14. For very young children, buy a set of safety tattoos that you can quickly apply to an arm or a leg to help I.D. an injured or lost kid. Check out www.safetytat.com.

15. Stay calm. A terrified parent is going to send the kids right over the edge. Practice “survival breathing.”

16. Every framed photo and mirror on the wall presents a danger. If they fall off, the glass will shatter. Consider removing glass from all of the frames or replacing it with Plexiglas.

17. Broken gas lines and power lines can cause fires. Keep at least two or three fire extinguishers  in the house. Know where they are and how to use them.

18. Know where the shut-off valve is for your neighbor’s natural gas line and how to turn off the neighbor’s electrical panel. If their house goes up in flames, chances are yours will, too.

19. A supply of dust face masks can help you breathe if the air is filled with smoke, dust, and other airborne particles. If you don’t have a dust mask, tie a T-shirt or another piece of fabric over your nose and mouth.

20. Keep a basic emergency kit at work to help you survive the quake and assist you with the basic supplies you’ll need to get home. As well, know multiple routes home and connect with others who live in your part of town. If several of you are traveling together, there’s safety in numbers.

21. Teach your kids to tap on anything within reach if they are ever trapped underneath furniture or other debris.

22. Bolt all tall pieces of furniture to the wall. It ain’t feng shui. It’s survival!

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Got the earthquake jitters? This list of 23 tips will help you prepare and survive by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/got-earthquake-jitters-list-23-tips-will-help-prepare-survive/feed/ 0
Special needs preppers: Single Moms http://thesurvivalmom.com/special-needs-preppers-single-moms/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=special-needs-preppers-single-moms http://thesurvivalmom.com/special-needs-preppers-single-moms/#comments Mon, 17 Mar 2014 12:00:00 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=12975 In the world of preparedness, most all information is aimed for an audience that includes a network of supportive family members, a spouse in particular. All of the tasks are daunting and the future scenarios gloomy beyond belief. Enter a Read More

The post Special needs preppers: Single Moms by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
image by monkey mash button

image by monkey mash button

In the world of preparedness, most all information is aimed for an audience that includes a network of supportive family members, a spouse in particular. All of the tasks are daunting and the future scenarios gloomy beyond belief. Enter a single mom who is responsible for the welfare of her children. If her income is the only one keeping the family afloat and there are few, if any, close friends or relatives in the vicinity, she is truly on her own.

How can a single mom prepare for the future?

Moms, if you’ve ever been faced with a car breakdown on the side of the road, alone, and without a cell phone, you have an idea of what it would feel like to be a single mom facing an uncertain future. At some point in that scenario, you have no choice but to seek out help from strangers or anyone willing to help. Therefore, I believe that the first step for single moms (and dads) is to start creating their own survival/prepper web of supportive people. This is the most important step because it takes a lot of time to find like-minded people who are also trustworthy and with whom you are compatible. In the preparedness world people are often suspicious of others, which adds to the amount of time you’ll need to create that web. Single moms can start by:

  • Checking out Meet-Up groups on topics related to preparedness and survival,such as camping, gardening, hiking, backyard chickens, organic produce, couponing. Some towns have groups labeled, “Survival” or “Preppers”, so it’s worth a search. Single moms, in particular, need to use a lot of common sense and caution when meeting with strangers, but these groups usually offer a safe way to get to know others who share your interests.
  • Finding a supportive church. Maybe church hasn’t really been your thing, but if you’re looking for a large group of people who already have a lot in common, this can be a great avenue. Often their activities include childcare as well as single parent social groups, which immediately connects you with others. And, don’t discount the importance of having a strong faith when faced with challenges that include the everyday frustrations of motherhood as well as potential worst case scenarios.
  • Checking out the state forums at American Preppers Network. Some states have very active groups, others not so much, but it’s one resource that will have local people who can steer you in the right direction for joining prepper groups.
  • Joining hobby clubs, such as ham radio or gardening clubs. The members of these clubs are already a little on the fanatical side and will probably welcome newcomers. (I base this claim on the number of ham radio operators I have met and who are active in their clubs. The dog club people were worse, maybe!)

Once your “preps” are pretty well established, consider joining A.N.T.S., a prepper network of folks ready to help others in the network in times of dire need. You need to be able to provide that help, if called upon, but then, someone will be there to come to your aid if necessary. As you connect with other people, there’s no need to tell them whether or not you have food storage or firearms or any other personal information. If someone starts asking too many questions, then that person or group isn’t the one for you. I’ve found that preppers respect the privacy of others and expect the same in return. Above all, trust your instincts. If a person, group, or situation seems to be not-quite-

image by Daizy B

image by Daizy B

right, walk away. There are thousands of solid, trustworthy preppers out there who would open their arms to a single mom and her kids. You just have to find each other.

Second step: Training and knowledge on the cheap

Thanks to the internet, and YouTube in particular, there is no shortage when it comes to information and training of skills in the survival and preparedness niche. You could easily become Super Prepper, simply by learning from YouTube videos and then practicing what you learn. Just a few skills to look for:

  • Canning
  • Pickling
  • Sewing
  • Knitting
  • Fire starting
  • Growing ______. (Name your fruit or vegetable.)
  • Packing dry food in buckets.
  • Sealing mylar bags
  • Storing water correctly
  • Purifying water
  • And on and on and on

It’s almost as easy to find free or very cheap training locally:

  • Sign up for classes that relate to preparedness.  Community colleges are one of the best resources for this and you might qualify for reduced tuition. Be sure to talk with the admissions office, since they will know about scholarships and discounts. Do NOT take out a loan for this, since so much information and training can be had for free, but if these classes are in your budget, you not only will accumulate college credits but also meet other people with the same interests.
  • Community colleges also offer non-credit classes in the evenings and on weekends, and these are generally very inexpensive.
  • Find out if your city offers community classes. These will probably include things like guitar and interpretive dance but might also include skills you’re looking for as a prepper.
  • County and university extension classes are free or low-cost.
  • Retail stores often offer free classes. Cabela’s, ProBass, craft stores and other specialty retail stores want buyers to learn their skills and, therefore, purchase their products. If a store offers classes for kids, that’s even better. Involve your kids with your survival learning every chance you get.
  • CERT classes. I’ve talked about my own experiences with CERT classes in my podcast. These are completely free and even furnish attendees with a basic emergency kit. Go to this site to search for classes near you.
  • Red Cross offers free and inexpensive classes online.
  • FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute offers free online classes and these can be excellent sources of information on everything related to disasters from learning about hazardous materials to dealing with animals in a natural disaster.
  • Many libraries offer classes of all kinds and almost always, they’re free.

 Include the kids whenever you can

image by photogramma1

image by photogramma1

A single mom’s most immediate group of allies and support are her own children. At whatever ages they might be, start training them from everything from how to put out a small fire to calling 911 to administering CPR.

Fortunately, survival and preparedness involve knowledge and skills that are very easy to learn and lots of fun.

Stock up on supplies as you can

Right along with learning and connecting with others, is the need to stock up on the food and supplies you’ll need to weather any storm. The best advice I have for you is from my book, Survival Mom.

Stocking up on food, extra toiletries, good quality tools, and
other supplies requires money. However, the good news is that a master
To Buy list will help set priorities, keep you on budget, and even provide
a shopping list when hitting the garage sale circuit.

Without a To Buy list, you may very well find yourself (a) spending
money on things you later discover tucked away in a back cupboard
or (b) snatching up purchases in a panic. This list helps save money
as well as time.

If your income is limited, you’ll need to become very creative. Estate sales, yard sales, going-out-of-business sales, Craigslist, Freecycle, and even programs like Swagbucks will need to become your new best friends.

An awful lot of survival supplies are extremely inexpensive. You can find used water barrels for less than $20. Wash out empty 2-liter soda bottles and refill them with water for cheap and easy water storage. For more expensive supplies, establish a savings plan, even if it’s just a few dollars per week.

The important piece, though, is to know what you need and then set priorities for your purchases, and that To Buy list will keep you on track and save you from impulse buys.

The prepared single Survival Mom

A single parent can be every bit as prepared as any other person in the survival/preparedness community. In fact, they have an advantage over a prepper whose spouse is not on board and might even try to prohibit any type of preparedness activities or expense.

Single parenting is no easy job, but when there are plans and supplies in place for various emergencies, there will be less panic and a lot more peace.

 

 

© 2014, The Survival Mom. All rights reserved.

The post Special needs preppers: Single Moms by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/special-needs-preppers-single-moms/feed/ 4