Aug62012

8 Comments

Food Storage Basics and Answers to your Questions (WEBINAR)

image by ChalonHandmade

Food storage is the Queen of Survival Topics on most sites and forums because, I guess, people are naturally drawn to food. That’s a good thing! Another reason so much attention is given to the topic is because food storage isn’t simple like, say, storing water. I’ve heard it describes as both a science and an art.

In my most recent webinar, “Food Storage Basics”, we covered the topic thoroughly, from reasons why to store food, stupid reasons to NOT store food, and beginning steps.

You can access the recorded webinar by clicking here.

In addition to the webinar, however, I wanted to answer a handful of frequently asked questions because there is always more to learn when it comes to food storage.

Q:  My kids are quite young, ages 2 and 3. Should I store food in amounts appropriate to their ages now or later when they’re eating more?

A:  It’s really, really smart to think about this ahead of time. As an older mom of two kids, ages 10 and 13, I can tell you that time will fly and before you know it, their appetites will surpass yours!  I recommend looking ahead and storing larger amounts of food, as though your kids were already those ages. A crisis may hit later this week and cause you to rely on your stored food and with extra, it will just last longer. It won’t go to waste. However, if some horrible event happens 5 or 6 years from now and you’ve stored your food correctly, there will be plenty for those older kids.

Q:  My husband wants us to store just the basics, saying that our family will eat anything if we’re hungry enough. I disagree but am not sure how to counter his argument. What do you think?

A:  Your husband wants to provide for his family and like a lot of men, just wants to get the job done and move on to something else! I can’t blame him. You, on the other hand, realize that there’s more to food than just filling tummies and holding off starvation. If you think about a time when your family has to rely on stored food, I can guarantee that it’s because of some very scary scenario. It could be an economic collapse, riots in the neighborhood, food shortages, a personal tragedy. Whatever the case, life is already going to be off the scale in terms of stress. Do you really think it’s a good idea to fight food battles every night, trying to get the kids, and yourself, to eat something barely palatable?

Instead, follow the directions given in this webinar and in my book. Start by making a list of foods your family enjoys eating right now that are healthy and require only shelf-stable ingredients. If your family loves, loves, loves scalloped potatoes, you can easily store dehydrated potato slices, dry milk, and cheese powder and make the same recipe no matter what is happening outside the four walls of your house.

When it comes to food storage, you can have it both ways: plenty of the basics AND delicious, comforting meals in a time of crisis.

Q:  Our family doesn’t eat much bread and yet most every food storage book and website claims that I need huge amounts of wheat? Why? Can I get by with less wheat or none at all?

A:  One of the misconceptions about wheat is that it is only used to make bread. Tortillas, crackers, biscuits, cookies, brownies!, and more require wheat! That’s why it’s smart to stock up on plenty. Additionally, wheat can be sprouted and eaten as sprouts or used to grow wheat grass. Cooked wheat kernels can be added to salads, soups, and other hot entrees.  There’s way more to wheat other than baking bread, and we don’t eat all that much bread, either.

During tough times, though, bread becomes literally a “staff of life.” It provides nutrients, calories, and fills tummies. There are all types of wheat that I’ll talk about in my webinar, “Everything you ever wanted to know about wheat,” but generally people buy hard wheat for recipes containing yeast and soft wheat for all other recipes.

 

Be sure to check my webinar schedule to see upcoming classes and recorded, on-demand webinars.

There may be links in the post above that are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission, which does not affect the price you pay for the product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers.

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© Copyright 2012 The Survival Mom, All rights Reserved. Written For: The Survival Mom
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I'm the original Survival Mom, and have been helping moms worry less and enjoy their homes and families more for 5 years. Come join me on my journey to becoming more prepared to handle everyday emergencies and worst case scenarios.

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(8) Readers Comments

  1. I’d like to point to my site real quick. a lot of food can simply be found. Also, one can some times grow food with out having it Look like a garden. That way you don’t attract others who will be inclined to try and take what you have.

    • I know of a number of people who have planted things like potatoes and amaranth in public areas to use as a food source if need be. Most people would never recognize many plants as edible.

  2. I STORE CANNED GOODS-MEATS, SOUPS, AND FRUIT. RICE HAS FEW CALORIES AND A CAN OF CORNED BEEF HASH WILL FEED TWO. PROTEIN IS BETTER THAN CARBS AND I DON’T CARE WHAT OTHERS SAY.
    I WAS IN THE FAR EAST AS A SOLDIER FOUND THE LOCAL TROOPS EATING RICE AND RAMON COULD NOT KEEP UP WITH US ON CANS OF MEAT. IN A SURVIVAL MOVEMENT MEATS OFFER MORE CALORIES PER POUND OR VOLUME IN YOUR PACK.
    THE RICE EATERS WILL DIE AND THE MEAT EATERS WILL LIVE. BY THE WAY ‘LONG PIG’ WILL BE YOPUR BEST BET TO SURVIVE

    • WW: I agree, besides many people have gluten intolerance, some are allergic to corn, many grains are also GMO’s. The Primal diet is the way to go…those with celiac disease and IBS have to lay off wheat and other gluten grains.

  3. Great webinar! I’m sorry I wasn’t able to attend live but I’m so thankful you recorded it. Please keep up the good work. Your knowledge is a blessing to us. Thank you.

  4. I agree. The over reliance on wheat is horrendous. I don’t eat wheat, because of the PAIN if causes me. Survival in not enough if it means an existance of prolonged pain. Rice may make me fat ( a good thing in survival considerations) but it does not translate into immovable agony.
    Yes, wheat makes crackers, tortillas, biscuits, and the like. Most people consider these to be bread products. Wheat as a sprouted grass is the ONLY redeemable use of wheat berries.

    • You can make that rice a whole lot more nutritious by adding amounts of other grains like millet and/or quinoa. The individual grains are about the same size, so they require about the same amount of cooking time as the rice. Look on my blog for a recipe for Super Rice.

  5. I find it interesting that many view food storage as only in context of a SHTF scenario.

    When my husband and I married in the early 1970s, we did what many were doing at the time- moved “back to the land”. We became dairy farmers and homesteaders, and continued to live that lifestyle for the next 28 years.

    We raised and butchered all our meat, raised a big garden and I canned and froze enough for the whole year. We bought staples in bulk and I made our own bread and baked goods.

    We stored food, not our of worry for the future, but because it was thrifty and because stored food is the nature of home-raised food. My pantry was as big as the kitchen and the root cellar nearly so.

    We are retired now, and travel full-time in our RV. We have been talking about our TEOTWAWKI options as older folks, and sadly I can’t see us being able to return to that labor-intensive homesteading life.

    Its a pity we can’t impart all those years of work and skill. I just want to tell you younger women that providing for your family in this time-honored and womanly way is intensely satisfying- even when its exhausting.

    Just a whiff of the scent of burnt sugar will take me back to those summers, especially when the kids were small and I could work all day in the heat and sing with gratitude that God had given me so many blessings.

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