The Survival Mom » Featured http://thesurvivalmom.com Helping moms worry less & enjoy life! Thu, 27 Nov 2014 07:00:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 We Are Truly Blessed http://thesurvivalmom.com/truly-blessed-thanksgiving/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/truly-blessed-thanksgiving/#comments Thu, 27 Nov 2014 07:00:15 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19352 Even for those of us who are not religious or don’t spend much time thinking about our faith, there are days when we should all take a moment to do just that. Some days, like Christmas and Easter, are undeniable Read More

The post We Are Truly Blessed by Liz Long appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Thanksgiving

Even for those of us who are not religious or don’t spend much time thinking about our faith, there are days when we should all take a moment to do just that. Some days, like Christmas and Easter, are undeniable in their religious connections, but Thanksgiving is simply American. The text at the end of this is Abraham’s Lincoln’s Proclamation establishing our modern Thanksgiving Day.

If you are sitting down to eat enough that you will not be hungry, then you have more than many in this world. On Thanksgiving, many of us sit down and eat until we are so stuffed we feel unwell. We are truly blessed to have the abundance to be able to do that.

Food, family, friends, a job we have at least have chosen (we aren’t slaves or serfs) – there are so many small blessings in life that it is sometimes hard to truly remember how much we have to be grateful for and not let the other things get in the way.

I have a husband and parents who love and support me. I have great kids who at least try to help sometimes. We’re all healthy. Our house is heated in winter, cooled in summer, and solid all year round. There is enough for us to eat well, including dark chocolate covered berries in the pantry. There are plenty of books I haven’t read on our bookcases and in my Kindle. We will all receive gifts we truly want, regardless of “need”, at Christmas.

Please share some of the blessings in your life.

 

Washington, D.C.
October 3, 1863

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unites States the Eighty-eighth.

By the President: Abraham Lincoln

William H. Seward,
Secretary of State

 

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post We Are Truly Blessed by Liz Long appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/truly-blessed-thanksgiving/feed/ 0
20+ Foods that must be re-packaged for long-term storage and how to repackage them http://thesurvivalmom.com/20-foods-that-must-be-re-packaged-for-long-term-storage-and-how-to-repackage-them/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/20-foods-that-must-be-re-packaged-for-long-term-storage-and-how-to-repackage-them/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 20:11:24 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=11969 As a follow-up to my blog post about which foods you shouldn’t plan on storing long-term, here’s a list of foods typically found at grocery stores that can be stored but must be repackaged. Keep in mind, that by repackaging Read More

The post 20+ Foods that must be re-packaged for long-term storage and how to repackage them by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Tutorial for20+ Foods that must be(3)As a follow-up to my blog post about which foods you shouldn’t plan on storing long-term, here’s a list of foods typically found at grocery stores that can be stored but must be repackaged.

Keep in mind, that by repackaging these foods you will also be protecting them from oxygen, pests, and humidity, three of the five enemies of food storage. (The other 2 are heat and light.)

  • Raisins and other dried fruit
  • Oatmeal
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Any type of cookie or cracker
  • Beans
  • Rice
  • Pasta
  • Bread crumbs
  • Cornmeal
  • Candy
  • Pancake mix (Sometimes these are packaged directly inside the cardboard box without any type of inner plastic bag.)
  • Pasta, rice, and potato convenience mixes, such as Rice-a-Roni, Pasta-Roni, instant potatoes, scalloped potato mixes, etc. (These may either have microscopic insect eggs inside the package already and/or be invaded by insects and rodents from the outside.)
  • Tea bags (Repackage for best flavor and longest possible shelf life.)
  • Dried, instant milk (If not already in a sealed can.)
  • Spices and herbs packaged in plastic bags
  • Shortening (Pack it into canning jars and then seal using a vacuum sealer.)
  • Chocolate chips, baking chips of any flavor
  • Nuts
  • Popcorn
  • Pretzels
  • Sugar, brown sugar and powdered sugar
  • Any type of mix to make bread, cornbread, pizza dough, etc.
  • Most anything else that is packaged in flimsy plastic bags and/or cardboard. This type of packaging is not intended for long-term storage, but that doesn’t mean the food inside can’t have a longer shelf life if repackaged correctly.

Repackaging with a vacuum packing machine

A vacuum packing machine, such as the Food Saver is my own preferred method of repackaging small to moderate amounts of food. These machines can be found on eBay and Craigslist at very affordable prices. Amazon, Walmart, Target, and Cabela’s carry them as well.

Pour the food into one of the plastic bags suitable for your machine and follow the machine’s instructions for vacuum sealing the bag. Use a Sharpie to mark the date sealed on the outside as well as the name of the food. (“Golden raisins, June 21, 2013″)

If a food can be easily crushed, such as cookies or crackers, place them in a large canning jar and seal it with your machine and a jar lid attachment. This is very convenient and gives long term results. If you want to store shortening, pack it into a canning jar, place the lid on top, cover with the jar sealer and seal it. Here is more information from the Food Saver company.

All the foods on my list can be packaged in canning jars. This is especially handy if you are storing food for just 1 or 2 persons or cannot lift heavy buckets and large mylar bags.

This video shows how to seal foods in canning jars.

Some foods with sharp edges, such as pasta, can wear through the plastic storage bag. To avoid this you can seal the food and then place it in a second sealing bag and seal a second time or place it first in a zip-loc bag (do not seal) and then into the food storage bag. The machine will suck the air out of both bags, sealing them shut at the same time.

Use food safe plastic buckets

Yes, the big plastic bucket — a staple in many a prepper/survivalist pantry. These buckets are popular because they can hold a very large amount of food, making many smaller containers  unnecessary. The plastic protects food from light, and although rodents and some insects can chew their way through the bucket to the food, that takes some time, and hopefully, you’ve pest-proofed your pantry!

It’s easy to obtain 5 gallon buckets, but smaller sizes may be harder to come by. If you’re lucky enough to live near a food storage retail store, such as Honeyville Farms, you can buy them in person. Grocery store bakeries buy things like frostings and fillings in food safe buckets and those are smaller. Often they will sell used buckets and may even give them away for free.

The biggest downside to the 5 gallon bucket is its weight. I cannot easily lift one of these when it’s filled with food. Dragging it along the ground is about all I can manage. And, once the bucket is opened, you’ll have to plan on using the food inside within a reasonable amount of time, say 6 months or so if storage conditions are optimal, or reseal the bucket.

Keep in mind that you’ll need to protect the food in an opened bucket from pests and deterioration caused by heat and humidity. I recommend using Gamma Seal lids to make it easier to open and close buckets. They will also help to keep pests out of the food.

I’ve written about storing food in buckets with more details here.

Add oxygen absorbers to extend shelf life

Pour your food into a canning jar, mylar bag or a food-safe bucket of an appropriate size. Just before sealing with the lid, drop in oxygen absorbers according to this chart:

100 cc absorber            32-ounce canning jar

300 cc                             #10 can

300 cc                              1 gallon container

1500 cc                            5 gallon container

For more detailed  instructions, read this. Oxygen absorbers are available on Amazon, from food storage retail stores, and I’ve even seen them in Winco grocery stores.

I also use empty and sanitized 2-liter soda bottles for things like rice and oats and add a 100 cc absorber just before capping the bottle.

Keep mind that as you open the package of absorbers, they start absorbing oxygen. You’ll know this is happening because they get hot. Quickly place the required number of absorbers in each container with the food and then store the remaining absorbers in a canning jar. (The lid of a canning jar gives a much tighter seal than other jars.)

The process of vacuum sealing using a Food Saver removes most of the oxygen that exists inside the bag. This will prolong the shelf life of those foods. However, over time I’ve found that air can and does leak into the sealed bags. When storing these vacuum sealed bags, do check on them at least once a year to see if any have refilled with air, and if so, open the bag and reseal.

A word about dry pack canning for long term storage food

Dry pack, or oven, canning is a process that involves pouring DRY food into canning jars, heating the jars, and then sealing them with lids and rings.

To be very clear, dry/oven canning is not the same as traditional canning, which uses a water bath or pressure canner. It’s simply heating up dry foods in canning jars and then closing them with seals and lids.

Since this article was first posted, I received a number of questions about dry canning, sometimes called oven canning. At first, the method sounded like an inexpensive way to repackage dry foods but with quite a bit of research, I haven’t come up with any true advantages and there are a couple of reasons to avoid this method.

From my research, it seems like the only advantages to this process is possibly killing insect eggs with the heat and that it doesn’t require the expense of a Food Saver.

A much better way to insure insect eggs are killed is by placing tightly sealed containers of food in the freezer for at least a week.

Heating these jars in the oven does not remove oxygen, which is a necessary step in prolonging shelf life. Storing any food in glass jars continues to allow the food to be affected by light, which also deteriorates food. (Store filled glass jars in boxes, under beds, and in any container that doesn’t allow in light for longest possible shelf life.)

The possibility of glass breakage exists since canning jars are designed to be heated in wet environments, such as a hot water bath, and not in a dry oven. Canning jars are made from tempered glass, which is designed to break into hundreds of fairly harmless little particles, not shards. However, to be on the safe side, it’s best to use canning jars for their original purpose only.

How dangerous is dry/oven canning? If only dry foods, such as flour or oats are involved, I’d say the risk of a glass jar exploding in the oven is very slight. Bacterial growth in such foods is negligible as long as no moisture is present. Some nutrients will be lost due to the application of heat, but dangerous? In my many hours of research, I’m not convinced, but there doesn’t seem to be any reason to use this method, either! All it seems to do is heat up the food, maybe kill insect eggs, but little else.

The previous repackaging methods I’ve listed are far easier and more effective in lengthening the shelf life of food, which is the main point of this activity in the first place!

Pin this for later

Tutorial for20+ Foods that must be(3)

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post 20+ Foods that must be re-packaged for long-term storage and how to repackage them by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/20-foods-that-must-be-re-packaged-for-long-term-storage-and-how-to-repackage-them/feed/ 39
24 Ways to Prepare for Your Spring Garden in the Dead of Winter http://thesurvivalmom.com/24-ways-prepare-spring-garden-dead-winter/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/24-ways-prepare-spring-garden-dead-winter/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 07:00:00 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19478 It can be hard to think about gardening when it’s below freezing, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try. Cold weather is the perfect time for planning! If you are thinking (like I might have perhaps thought in the past) Read More

The post 24 Ways to Prepare for Your Spring Garden in the Dead of Winter by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

spring gardenIt can be hard to think about gardening when it’s below freezing, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try. Cold weather is the perfect time for planning!

If you are thinking (like I might have perhaps thought in the past) that you can just grab a few packs of seeds from the local hardware store or super store in April or so, put them in the ground, and you’ll see something come up in a few months, well, you’re mostly wrong. You definitely can grow food during the cooler months! It’s not rocket science, but it does require some thought and planning.

Fall Preparation

Before it freezes (or at least quickly after the first frost):

1. Remove and discard diseased parts of plants. But not into the compost! (If you put them into the compost, the weeds could sprout up wherever you use the compost later.

2. Mulch over any plants that might be susceptible to the cold (about 8″ deep), including over-wintering vegetables such as carrots, so they are still alive in the spring.

3. Make sure all beds are composted or mulched.

4. Clean up, maintain, and properly store garden tools and equipment. Note any that need replaced.

5. If any need significant repairs, take them in to be fixed.

6. Start a wish-list of gifts you would like. The holidays are approaching!

Planning

7. Order seed catalogs. There are multiple good companies, so go ahead and order a few. You may be surprised by what you find! SeedsNow, the company in the previous link, has non-GMO, heirloom, and hard-to-find seeds. These are not your Super Store seedpacks!

Remember: if you want to save the seeds from the plants to grow new plants in the future, you almost certainly will want heirloom varieties.

8. Decide if you want to use cold frames or another technique to extend your growing season. Plan and build accordingly, if you want to go for it.

9. Start diagramming/planning what you want where. Once you have a very general plan – vegetable garden, herb garden, annuals, perennials, bushes, and trees planned out – it’s time to start getting more specific.

10. Check the viability and test germination of any seeds you have on hand.

11. When planning, start with the plants that take the longest to mature and will be there for the longest – the trees. Next come bushes, then perennials including any perennial herbs, annuals including vegetables, and finally any potted plants.

The last would be plants that can’t survive in your area that you really want. In my case, I have some potted chamomile and an aloe plant that I bring in during the winter. Other people have lemon trees, but it could be almost anything.

12. Ask these questions for trees, bushes, perennials, and annuals:

  • Do you want to plant any new ones?
  • What kind?
  • How will planting these affect other plants you’ll put nearby? If you put in a tree that gets very wide, so you probably won’t want to plant bushes or anything long-lasting near it, but annual flowers could do great and provide a nice pop of color!
  • Are there any other plants that cannot coexist with it?
  • What plants do really well with it?
  • Where do you want them on your lot? You may realize that you want a vegetable garden near the driveway, but you need some bushes between it and your teenage driver.

13. Start picking out what you want! I think this is the most fun. I can totally lose myself in seed catalogs, like the online one from Seeds Now.

Guidance on Picking Plants

14. Decide what you are looking for, and why. I like unusual varieties of common plants, like yellow carrots or banana melons. You might prefer more traditional orange carrots.

15. Do you want to involve your kids? My youngest loves picking out plants. It makes him crazy-happy to pick out, plant, nurture, and (sometimes) eat plants. There are areas in the garden with nothing planned so he can put whatever makes him happy. And yes, sometimes he decides on a spot I know or that makes me a bit crazy, but it still goes there unless I have a really good reason not to – like it’s right exactly where the mower will kill it.

16. Don’t forget to check which grow zone you live in. Your county or state extension service might have more detailed information available, or ask at a local nursery, to get the best information. this Seed Finder Tool from SeedsNow.com is a great tool, as well.

17. If you plant an herb garden, be sure to check which weeds are considered weeds or pests in your area. I planted lemon balm, which can go crazy, but I made sure to plant it where the driveway, a brick walk, and the house formed three sides, containing it a bit. (It’s apparently a member of the mint family, and they all grow like crazy pretty easily.) Yarrow is also considered a weed, but not invasive like lemon balm. So, to me, as a not-so-active-gardener, that just means yarrow will be harder for my chronic neglect to kill.

18. Think about what you actually use and eat. I planted about 8 oregano plants a few years ago and they grew great – but I rarely use oregano in my cooking. I love the smell of lavender and it’s a slight bug repellant, so I have planted a bunch of that around the house. I am interested in herbal remedies, so I planted yarrow, several kinds of mint and chamomile. The last two are potted. One, so it doesn’t spread and take over everything, the other because it can’t survive a winter outside in our climate.

19. Use kitchen leftovers to start new plants. Since you’ve already eaten them, you know these are veggies you’ll like.

Steps to Take Mid-Winter

20. Consider the weather – is it an unusually cold or snowy winter? Is it mild? If it is mild, then you probably don’t need to do anything extra to your plants, but if it is a really cold or snowy year, you might want to protect your plants better. Last year, I lost almost all of the strawberry plants that I had nurtured from a few starts over the previous four years! A layer of mulch over top of them would have kept the cold out and the plants alive, even though they didn’t need it in previous warmer winters.

21. Take advantage of the increased visibility from all the plants dying or being dormant and take a good look at your grounds. Are there areas of erosion? If so, you have a project for spring and can start researching and planning how to best fix it.

22. Can you see roots damaging walls, foundations, pathways, or anything else? Don’t forget to check the area near the septic field and the well. In the spring, have a professional take care of any problematic roots. Research a good tree service and ask for referrals from friends and neighbors.

23. Where does the snow and ice melt first and where does it last? That gives you an idea of what spots naturally receive more sunlight or less sunlight. Of course, the micro-climate(s) in your yard will be a little different when the trees have leaves and as the angles of the sun change, but this will give you a starting point.

24. It’s finally time to start planting, even with the ground frozen rock-hard. Start your hardy (early season) plants indoors. In four to six weeks, you can put them in the ground and start the next group of plants inside. A Grow Zone map can  help you determine what to plant and when, as the weather begins to warm up.

Hopefully these tips will help you and your family get excited for your garden for next summer and you’ll have a great growing season!

Enjoy the process and the produce!

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post 24 Ways to Prepare for Your Spring Garden in the Dead of Winter by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/24-ways-prepare-spring-garden-dead-winter/feed/ 1
5 Uses for an Indoor Tent http://thesurvivalmom.com/5-uses-indoor-tent/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/5-uses-indoor-tent/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 14:21:44 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19515 PEST FREE During a family vacation and faced with an unexpected storm, we decided to rent a small unfurnished cabin at a state park. As soon as we had our sleeping bags spread on the floor, our pillows fluffed, and Read More

The post 5 Uses for an Indoor Tent by Helen Ruth appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

DOMETENTHelenCates

PEST FREE

During a family vacation and faced with an unexpected storm, we decided to rent a small unfurnished cabin at a state park. As soon as we had our sleeping bags spread on the floor, our pillows fluffed, and the room dark, a million feet started crawling over our faces and legs. Oh, the horror when we switched on the lights.

Every conceivable, imaginable creature had crawled out of the woodwork. I had never seen so many bugs in one place. On top of that, we had several raccoons circling around the cabin.

Then I remembered our tent. Not wanting to sleep indoors or outdoors for that matter, we decided to set the tent up inside. Thankfully, it was one of those easy pop up dome tents that didn’t require stakes.

After zipping ourselves inside the tent, we were finally comfortable.

We quickly learned the value of owning an indoor dome tent, and I’ve since added a smaller one to our preps for this type of emergency. During a crisis and without power, an indoor tent would also be helpful when dealing with mosquitoes or even bedbugs while on travel.

QUARANTINE

What to do in limited living conditions when a family member is sick? An Indoor tent enables you to set up a sick bay on a porch, or somewhere off to the side where they won’t be disturbed.

An indoor sick bay is especially helpful when you have children sharing a room with siblings. Having the sick child “camp” to the side of the room would not only separate them from being contagious, but they could turn it into a fun camping experience.

Worst case scenario, dealing with something highly contagious or a pandemic, having a means to separate family members in their own living space is critical.

EVACUATION

Having an indoor dome tent stashed in your bug out bag or vehicle is essential. Whether you plan to bug in or you have another destination in mind during an evacuation, a dome tent can provide you with some privacy whether you are camping inside a public emergency shelter or staying with friends and relatives.

A tent would help you to claim your space and make your temporary living conditions more bearable, especially when forced to sleep in a brightly lit, high traffic area. Being able to keep your belongings enclosed will also add just a tiny bit of security against thieves. (I’m not saying a lot, but at least they can’t just reach out and grab something off the cot behind you.) Indoor tents use little space, are usually cheap, and set up quickly, making them ideal for use as a temporary emergency shelter.

SLEEPOVERS

Just like evacuations, an indoor tent could provide a sleeping spot for visiting relatives. Many times when we’ve had family over, there would be children and adults using the couch or floor to make their beds. A tent would easily keep them sheltered off to the side of the room. An added benefit is that they would be less disturbed when family members are staying up late, or early risers. The tent would also come in handy for those surprise visitors who end up at your house during an emergency.

Are your kids looking for  an adventure? Let them “camp” in the house. An indoor tent with a mattress pad (or sofa cushions) and sleeping bags can be a source of tremendous joy for kids.

HEAT

Indoor tents have been flying off the shelves in South Korea. Millions have sold to families trying to stay warm. With surging blackouts and rising utility costs, many Koreans claimed they’ve saved over half on their utility bills.

During a blackout and severe winter storm, an indoor tent could be a life saver.

When shopping for an indoor tent, keep the house size in mind. For inside, I purchased a 4X5 dome tent. Anything larger would have taken up too much space. I wasn’t concerned about it being waterproof for reasons I hope are obvious. This type of tent is relatively cheap and can usually be found for $25 or less., especially during seasonal sales. The Monodome Tent for 2 Persons is an inexpensive option from Amazon and even comes with its own carry bag.

For outside, I purchased a 7X10 dome tent with excellent reviews about how rainproof it was. Although much larger, it could also be used indoors if needed.

A true canopy bed with heavy curtains all the way around and across the top can serve the same purpose in trapping heat in the winter. (The princessy ones with something akin to tulle floating across the top with “panels” on each corner that wouldn’t reach more than about a foot in any direction won’t do anything to keep you warm.) That is why people originally had canopy beds with big heavy curtains on them – to stay warm in bed when the house was cold. But I still find value in the dome tent as it allows us to be more mobile, and there just aren’t that many real canopy beds around anymore.

Do you have any other ideas on the uses of an indoor tent? We would love to hear your experiences or ideas.

 

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post 5 Uses for an Indoor Tent by Helen Ruth appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/5-uses-indoor-tent/feed/ 2
Dem Bones: First Aid and Herbal Response for Fractures http://thesurvivalmom.com/dem-bones-first-aid-herbal-response-fractures/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/dem-bones-first-aid-herbal-response-fractures/#comments Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:16:43 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19435 Bone fractures are definitely emergencies that require standard first aid followed by professional medical care from a doctor. However, there are several ways herbs can be utilized as whole body support after emergency medical care has been given. Before we Read More

The post Dem Bones: First Aid and Herbal Response for Fractures by Agatha Noveille appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Dem BonesBone fractures are definitely emergencies that require standard first aid followed by professional medical care from a doctor.

However, there are several ways herbs can be utilized as whole body support after emergency medical care has been given. Before we get started on the herbal side of things, let’s take a look at standard fracture first aid as a refresher.

Fracture First Aid

Always keep up to date on your first aid certifications with an organization like the Red Cross, when possible. It gives you hands on training that will be helpful in this type of emergency. Another great idea is to keep a first aid handbook easily accessible, so that you have a checklist to follow as you wait for professionals to arrive. Still, fracture first aid is usually straight forward.

Do:

  1. Stop any bleeding
  2. Immobilize
  3. Apply ice
  4. Be careful of shock

Don’t:

  1. Try to push any protruding bones back in if they have broken the skin
  2. Try to straighten a crooked limb.
  3. Move the person at all if the injury affects the back or neck. Instead, wait for help to arrive and keep the injured person still.

Once a doctor takes care of the fractures, herbs can be used for after-care as an adjunct to your doctor’s instructions. Be sure to get the all clear first, and then herbs traditionally used for pain, healing, and providing extra minerals for the diet can all be incorporated.

Pain

Bone healing is an inherently inflammatory process. In this case, inflammation is a good thing. NSAID drugs (like over the counter pain relievers) actually inhibit the exact processes the body is trying to use to repair bone. This means that they may help with pain, but using them may extend the overall healing time.

Some traditional herbal alternatives include St. John’s Wort, Jamaican Dogwood, California Poppy, and Valerian. Extract form is often the best form these herbs, rather than a tea. The extract is more convenient and can be taken in a little juice or other beverage to disguise the strong, unpleasant tastes of these herbs. Poppy and Valerian both also offer the advantage of being nervine herbs traditionally used to settle the nerves and promote sleep.

Don’t use St. John’s Wort if you are taking prescription drugs. This herb is notorious for interfering with medications.

Healing

Healing a fracture requires good nutrition. Not only does healing utilize more calories than normal, the body will also need extra protein. Bone is around 70% minerals in total composition, so making sure to get enough calcium and other minerals is another big nutritional factor.

Herbs for Minerals:

  • Horsetail
  • Nettles
  • Oatstraw
  • Dandelion

These herbs can be prepared as teas and steeped overnight to be extra strong. In this case, sipping on them over the course of the day is a better approach than drinking them all in one go.

Comfrey

Comfrey is another herb traditionally used for healing fractures. There is a modern debate about whether or not comfrey should be used internally, but it can still be used topically.

If the fracture requires a cast, it’s best to wait until the cast comes off before beginning to apply a comfrey compress or poultice. A simple compress can be made by preparing a strong tea of comfrey leaves, soaking a clean flannel cloth in the tea, and then applying the cloth to the affected area. Once the cloth cools, it can either be dipped into the tea and reapplied or washed to use again later.

Poultices work in much the same way, but the fresh or dried leaves are mashed with just enough water to form a paste, spread directly onto the skin, and held in place with a cloth. Poultices are usually changed out every four hours.

Wilderness First Aid

If you like to hike or camp, live remotely, or are otherwise often not near medical help, you might want to consider taking Wilderness First Aid. If you can’t find a provider with a quick Google search, you might contact the local Boy Scout Council (even if you aren’t even remotely affiliated). They should be able to help you find a good resource for it because they require leaders trained in it for certain types of outings.

Wilderness First Aid is, among other things, one of if not the only place a person who is NOT an EMT or medical professional can receive training so that they can determine if a person with a back or neck injury can be moved. They also train you in how to splint a broken bone with whatever you have on hand, and how to transport people who are injured. All of that might be very handy if you are with someone who falls and fractures an arm or leg a mile from the trailhead, at the bottom of the great sledding hill everyone loves (the one with no cell service), or when a car slides on the ice or an oil slick and goes into a ditch.

Even if you prefer an herbal approach to managing your health, it’s important to realize that herbs cannot miraculously set a fracture- it’s important to have the break seen by a medical professional who can realign the bones and set the stage for the body to do it’s thing!

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post Dem Bones: First Aid and Herbal Response for Fractures by Agatha Noveille appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/dem-bones-first-aid-herbal-response-fractures/feed/ 0
Parboiled Rice: The Rice You’ve Never Heard Of http://thesurvivalmom.com/parboiled-rice/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/parboiled-rice/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 16:00:00 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19401 In our family, rice, not potatoes, is King of the Starches. This is because my husband grew up in places like Hawaii, Guam, and the Marshall Islands, eating rice every day of his life. When I started stocking up on Read More

The post Parboiled Rice: The Rice You’ve Never Heard Of by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
parboiled rice

What is parboiled rice?

In our family, rice, not potatoes, is King of the Starches. This is because my husband grew up in places like Hawaii, Guam, and the Marshall Islands, eating rice every day of his life.

When I started stocking up on various foods, I knew that rice would be a big part of my starches. Potatoes, not so much. Rice is just as versatile as potatoes and has the added advantage of coming in numerous varieties, each with their own particular flavor, scent, and texture.

Parboiled rice was new to me when I first saw it on a food storage company website. At first, I thought it was somehow pre-cooked rice, maybe similar to instant, but then I bought a #10 can, began cooking it, and now I’m hooked.

The process of creating parboiled rice

When rice is harvested, each grain is inside a hull. That hull is removed and brown rice is the result. We get white rice when the rice is processed even further when the bran is removed. Parboiled rice is processed completely differently.

The parboiling process occurs when the just-harvested rice is soaked, steamed, and then dried with the hull still on each grain. This allows the grain of rice to absorb the nutrients in the hull and bran and it gives the rice a firmer texture. Once this has been completed, then the hull is removed. The rice ends up having a pretty light yellow color, although once cooked, the color of the rice is more of a creamy white.

Parboiled rice will never be sticky rice. It has a much drier and fluffier consistency.

Using the rice in meals

I’ve found that parboiled rice is excellent in recipes because it stays firm throughout the cooking process. A couple of years ago I was making a chicken and rice soup, and noticed that the rice never got mushy, no matter how long I cooked the soup or warmed up leftovers.

Leftover parboiled rice is nice to have on hand because, again, it doesn’t become mushy and can be added to other recipes or reheated as a side dish.

Parboiled rice is an excellent type of rice to store for long-term storage. It has more nutrients than brown rice, but because the bran has been removed, it won’t become rancid as brown rice will. The rice should be stored in air-tight containers with an oxygen absorber or, for smaller amounts, stored in canning jars which have had the air removed via a vacuum system like Food Saver. Store all food, not just parboiled rice, in a cool, dry, and dark location.

A recipe for you

I created several different recipes using parboiled rice, and this one is extremely simple, filling, and comforting on chilly days.

Herbed Chicken & Rice Soup

5 c. water

2 T. chicken soup base or 3 T. chicken bouillon

1/2 c. parboiled rice

1 T. Italian seasoning

1/4 t. garlic powder, or 1 garlic clove, crushed

1 t. dehydrated chopped onion, or 1/4 c. fresh onion, chopped

1/4 c. chicken TVP or 1 1/2 c. chopped, cooked chicken

Easy instructions:

In a medium size saucepan, combine all ingredients. Cook over medium heat 20-25 minutes or until rice is fully cooked.

Where to buy it

Now, there’s the rub. It’s not so easy to find. Mahatma sells parboiled rice in 2 and 5 pound packages. I found this listing on the Costco website. If you are shopping in regular grocery stores, the store manager might be able to order the rice for you.

I’ve purchased a fairly large quantity of parboiled rice from Ready Reserve Foods, a small family-owned company in southern Idaho. A few years ago my family was on an epic camping trip, traveling from Arizona to Oregon, through Idaho, Utah, and then back home. Since I had become acquainted online with the owners of Ready Reserve Foods, we stopped at their offices.

We visited their food packaging area, where they explained how they use nitrogen to remove the oxygen from the foods they package, and I got to learn about parboiled rice for the first time. The parboiled rice they sell is grown in the U.S. and is processed at a plant just 10 miles from their offices.

If you’ve been hesitant about stocking up on white rice because of its limited nutritional value and on brown rice because of its limited shelf life, perhaps parboiled rice is what you’ve been looking for.

Discount for you: Through December 31, 2014, Ready Reserve Foods is offering 20% off all their food products, including parboiled rice. Use coupon code SURVIVAL.

 

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post Parboiled Rice: The Rice You’ve Never Heard Of by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/parboiled-rice/feed/ 7
Safe, Sexy, Secure Concealed Carry Women’s Holster http://thesurvivalmom.com/sexy-concealed-carry-womens-holster/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/sexy-concealed-carry-womens-holster/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:25:29 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19380 I own multiple holsters to use when carrying my handgun concealed: inside-the-waistband paddle holster, soft-sided hip holster, and a plastic hip holster. None of them are “bad” but I dislike all of them because they way they sit on my Read More

The post Safe, Sexy, Secure Concealed Carry Women’s Holster by Amy Van Riper appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

AVR CanCan Review TitleI own multiple holsters to use when carrying my handgun concealed: inside-the-waistband paddle holster, soft-sided hip holster, and a plastic hip holster. None of them are “bad” but I dislike all of them because they way they sit on my body. With each holster, the firearm is noticeable under my clothes. This is called “printing.” In fall and winter months when a sweater or jacket can be worn, it isn’t quite as noticeable, but summertime (or even fall in Florida) meant not carrying on my body at all.

Enter the Can Can Concealment Holster Company!

Can Can Concealment offers several different styles of “safe, sexy holstering” including those worn around the hips, a full corset style, and two leg garter styles. You can also choose from several accent colors. I ordered the original Hip Hugger Holster with purple accent.

Classic Hip Hugger with purple trim and an Extender holding a Ruger SR22 handgun.

Classic Hip Hugger with purple trim and an Extender holding a Ruger SR22 handgun.

Carrying concealed on the body can cause issues for women. Using a public restroom or trying on clothes in a store can create a safety problem when wearing traditional holsters. Do you unholster? Remove the holster? Just let it dangle? Good  women’s holsters can be tough to find.

Women who wear yoga pants also have difficulties carrying at the hip since the pants are often not sturdy enough to support the firearm and holster. But with the Hip Hugger Holster, the firearm can stay securely in place in each of these situations.

Choosing and Sizing

Be sure to follow the instructions on how to measure and choose the size that would best fit you.  I opted to choose a size smaller than suggested but add a “cell pocket extender.” This allowed me to have an extra pocket that fits my iPhone perfectly while being just the right size, and also allowing the holster to fit without the extender as I continue with some weight loss. Multiple rows of hook and eye closures make the holster very adjustable.

There are also options depending on the size of your handgun. The Classic Hip Hugger is made for smaller handguns, while the Big Shebang model will support larger handguns.

Multiple handgun pockets allow for kidney or appendix carry for right or left handers… or the option to carry up to four handguns at once! There are also more pockets to hold extra magazines, pepper spray, a knife or lipstick.

A friend asked a very important question: What about the muffin top?

Definitely something I was a bit concerned about when I purchased the Hip Hugger Holster, because I am not thin and smooth like the woman in the above linked video. But as it turns out that wearing this holster gives me LESS of a muffin top than wearing jeans alone. It’s actually slimming!

Note that these are not just women’s holsters. The Stealth Sport Belt, in particular, is perfect for men who want to carry concealed.

women's holsterThe Bottom Line…

The Can Can Concealment Classic Hip Hugger Holster…

  • Is comfortable to wear
  • Keeps the handgun secure against my body even when wearing yoga pants
  • Has the ability to also carry other items
  • Is pretty and has color options
  • Has very little “printing” even with slimmer fit clothing
  • Is made in the USA!
  • It’s slimming!

It’s a total winner for me! Buy this for yourself, as a gift for a friend, or put it on your Christmas list! 

**Can Can Concealment has offered a discount just for Survival Mom readers! Enter code RIPERMOM15 for 15% off your order! (Expires December 31,2014)**

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post Safe, Sexy, Secure Concealed Carry Women’s Holster by Amy Van Riper appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/sexy-concealed-carry-womens-holster/feed/ 2
The Survival Mom Radio Network Signs Off http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-mom-radio-network/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-mom-radio-network/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 11:00:40 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19566 Two years ago a friendly acquaintance on Facebook said to me, “Lisa, why don’t you create your own podcast network?” I had been tossing around some ideas with him about setting up my own podcast and, possibly, joining a network. Read More

The post The Survival Mom Radio Network Signs Off by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

PinkRetroRadio-150x150Two years ago a friendly acquaintance on Facebook said to me, “Lisa, why don’t you create your own podcast network?” I had been tossing around some ideas with him about setting up my own podcast and, possibly, joining a network.

There was something about his suggestion that stuck in my brain, and although I knew nothing of podcasting, much less running a network, that idea had been planted, and it wasn’t going anywhere!

In January of 2013, I began putting plans together and casually asked a group of women bloggers if they might be interested in joining me with weekly shows. An all-women network was what I had in mind. A far more experienced podcaster said to me bluntly, “All women hosts isn’t going to work,” but I knew that it could. There were already 2 or 3 “prepper” networks out there, and since I’ve never been one to fit a mold, I wanted the Survival Mom network to be different, not narrowly focused on prepper/survival topics only.

As more than a dozen hosts signed on, I became more and more nervous. I knew nothing of sound editing, nor did my husband, who was going to be my partner in running the network. We didn’t have any advertisers and, frankly, had no idea if our shows would have even a few dozen listeners.

Our official launch date was April 8, 2013. Among that early group of hosts was Vickilynn Haycraft, Donna Miller, Charley Cooke, Julie Behling-Hovdal, Sharon Peterson, Angela Paskett, and Kendra from New Life on a Homestead.

As a team, we faced one hurdle after another, but our group persevered and stood by me as I made more than my fair share of mistakes. (Thanks, ladies!)

Eventually, we learned that our efforts were paying off in huge numbers of downloads. Just between June 1, of this year through the end of October, our shows were downloaded more than 2 million times. Clearly, we’ve reached our audience, and then some, and they aren’t all women! We have plenty of men who listen to our shows and enjoy them.

The Family Factor

At this point, let me say that when I first started the blog, my kids were just 7 and 9. They have grown up as The Survival Mom’s kids, and have, I hope, enjoyed the experience. However, now they are both young teens. My daughter is 15, my son will turn 13 on Thanksgiving Day.

If you’re a parent, you know that feeling when you look at your children and suddenly realize that your time with them is running short.

That’s where I stand now.

Running the podcast network was one of the most time consuming projects I had ever tackled. Each show is time sensitive. A Monday show can’t just casually show up on Wednesday afternoon or Saturday mid-morning! The process of maintaining that weekly schedule kept my husband and I on our toes for a year and a half.

About a month ago, I realized that I needed to set aside the network in order to focus more on my kids, their last few  years of homeschooling, and then just wait on God to see where my path takes me next.

Closing Up Shop

The week of Monday, November 24, is the last week that brand new shows will be produced for the network. My own podcast will continue and, for now, it will continue on The Survival Mom Radio Network feed every Tuesday. If you’ve been listening to our  shows via Stitcher, iTunes, or any other podcast app, you’ll see new episodes of my show and it will continue indefinitely.

I wanted to end the shows this coming week so my hosts could relax, enjoy the holidays, and have plenty of time to decide whether or not their own shows will continue. You can keep up to date with them by visiting their websites, Facebook pages, and by signing up for their newsletters. As well, for those hosts who continue their shows, they will likely be on the Prepper Broadcasting Network.

All of our past network episodes will be available to you 24/7 on The Survival Mom Radio Network website. They can be listened to directly from the website or downloaded to your computer for later listening. In the coming weeks, we’ll be taking steps to make it easier for you to search the podcasts by topic. With more than 700 episodes available, there is a vast amount of information and entertainment, and it will take you months to get through all of it!

For now, I’ll be spending time writing blog articles and may add a few ebooks in the near future. For sure, I’ll be careful about where I commit my time, and I encourage each of you to do the same. Your kids may be grown and long since out of the house, but so often in our culture, we end up spending time on things that are of lesser importance and end up neglecting things of real value.

Thank you for being part of my Survival Mom journey and for those of you who were loyal listeners to our podcasts, we appreciated you more than you’ll ever know.

 

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post The Survival Mom Radio Network Signs Off by The Survival Mom appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-mom-radio-network/feed/ 9
The Living Off the Land Fallacy http://thesurvivalmom.com/living-off-land-fallacy/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/living-off-land-fallacy/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 07:00:39 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=19054 A common plan tossed around by survivalists and preppers is this idea that in the event of martial law or some other crisis, they are going to head off to the hills, presumably for weeks or months, and just live Read More

The post The Living Off the Land Fallacy by Jim Cobb appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

living off the landA common plan tossed around by survivalists and preppers is this idea that in the event of martial law or some other crisis, they are going to head off to the hills, presumably for weeks or months, and just live off the land.  While this sort of plan might appeal to the pioneer and bushcraft spirit, if nothing else, the reality is that for most people, this is just planning to fail.

Basic Problems

There are a few problems with falling into what I call the Living Off the Land Fallacy.  For starters, while the DNR isn’t likely going to be enforcing fair hunting rules, you aren’t going to be the only goofball out there with a rifle or bow.  If you’ve ever gone hunting with someone brand new to it, you know just how frustrating, even dangerous, it can be.  They don’t know how to be quiet.  They want to take shots that are risky at best.  They just don’t know what the heck they are doing, right?  Now, multiply that times a thousand as there are going to be a ton of other folks, just like that, out there looking for their own dinners.

On top of that, it won’t take long before tens of thousands of house pets are going to turn feral and be competing with you for the small game.  Granted, some folks might look at that as just being an addition of potential targets for lunch.  Even so, competition is going to be fierce.  It won’t take long before even the ubiquitous squirrel is scarce.

Fishing

What about fishing?  Okay, not a bad plan but do you really think you’re going to be the only Babe Winkelman out there wetting a line?  Plus, likely as not you’re also going to have at least a small segment of the population who will sit on the sidelines and wait for someone to reel in a good sized bass, then take it from them by hook or by crook.

I grew up in an area where deer hunting is akin to religion.  The school district darn near shuts down during gun season, given how many students head up north with their parents to see about adding a trophy to the wall.  These people have been hunting for generations and know all the tricks.  Yet, for all of that, only about a third of them are successful in a given year.  Granted, that’s big game, but still, food for thought.

Wild Edibles

As for wild edibles, that’s something to consider, but you need to know what you’re doing so as to avoid poisonous lookalikes and such.  Plus, consider the fact that the crisis may hit in the dead of winter, when not too many things are growing in abundance.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not suggesting you abandon all plans for hunting/fishing/trapping/gathering.  Instead, consider those options as ways to supplement what you’ve stockpiled and grown on your own.  Generally speaking, the plan would be to have enough food packed away to get you through at least one, if not two, complete growing seasons.  Have plans in place for growing much of your own food from seeds you harvest yourself.  Raise chickens, goats, and other potential meat sources.  Learn now the best ways to preserve meat if you don’t have access to electricity, and thus freezers.

Above all, abandon the attitude of “Me hunter. Me go kill meat for family.”  That way of thinking will indeed likely result in a death, but probably not of the four-legged variety.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post The Living Off the Land Fallacy by Jim Cobb appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/living-off-land-fallacy/feed/ 25
“I’m a Survival Girl” contest! http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-girls-contest-barbies/ http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-girls-contest-barbies/#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 16:17:00 +0000 http://thesurvivalmom.com/?p=18722 Attention girls, ages 8-12! Show off your Survival Girl skills and knowledge in this fun contest! We’d love to hear all about what you have done to become better prepared for everyday emergencies. Have you learned how to sew or Read More

The post “I’m a Survival Girl” contest! by Liz Long appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>

Survival Girls 2Attention girls, ages 8-12! Show off your Survival Girl skills and knowledge in this fun contest!

We’d love to hear all about what you have done to become better prepared for everyday emergencies. Have you learned how to sew or grow a garden? Have you packed your own emergency kit or taken a first aid class?

Here’s your chance to show off and win some cool prizes at the same time!

RULES

You must be a girl, ages 8-12, and live in the United States.

Your entry must consist of both photos and a written paragraph documenting what you have done.

Submit at least 4 photos, but no more than 8. They don’t have to be professional quality but should provide a clear image of what you have done. Example:  A photo of the contents of your emergency bag.

The written paragraph should explain and give details about what you have done, what you’ve learned, and why you consider yourself to be a Survival Girl. This isn’t Language Arts class, so don’t worry too much about grammar and spelling, but we can’t judge what we can’t understand! Ask a grown up to double-check what you’ve written, just to be sure it’s clear.

Please email entries to admin@thesurvivalmom.com with the paragraph in the body (message section) of the email and the photos attached. Entries must be received by midnight on Friday, December 5. Winners will be announced on or before Monday, December 15.

HOW ENTRIES WILL BE JUDGED

It’s easy to pick up a few tips and pointers about a lot of different subjects, but it takes a lot of time (sometimes years!) to become an expert. We’re looking for Survival Girls who have gone beyond that first step of just picking up a few bits of information about a lot of areas and have started down the path toward being an expert.

Judging will be based on the entire entry, with photos and the paragraph carrying equal weight, as it demonstrates to our judging panel what you have learned and what you have accomplished as a Survival Girl.

PRIZES

5 winners will be selected.

Each winner will receive an Entrepreneur Barbie to recognize your pioneering and impressive efforts and a certificate of recognition.

In addition, the First and Second place winners will receive a birdhouse and 5 lbs of bird seed from Audubon Park.

First place winner will also receive a beautiful sterling silver Lovely Hearts Bracelet from IsabelleGrace.

 

 

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

The post “I’m a Survival Girl” contest! by Liz Long appeared first on The Survival Mom. Be sure to check it out!

]]>
http://thesurvivalmom.com/survival-girls-contest-barbies/feed/ 0