Oct192009

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Are You a Prepper?

survival-mom-button-preparedWhatever your age, I’ll bet you can name all the cliques that existed at your high school.  At mine, we had the druggies, cowboys, jocks and scholars.  Oh, and the Pregnant Girls.  Some cliques were cool, others were not.  I was Vice President of the National Honor Society, so I’ll let you figure out which group claimed me as a member!  (I was such a nerd back then!)  I guess it’s human nature to assign labels to groups of people, and now, it would seem, I have a new label.  I’m a prepper.

I’ve had a tough time defining what it means to be a prepper.  It means more than stocking up on canned goods and more than knowing four ways to start a fire.  Some preppers are gun nuts, others aren’t.  If I know what Paracord is and I carry emergency blankets in my car, does that make me a prepper?

Another blogger with the charming name of YeOldFurt, has written quite a comprehensive definition that answers the question, “What, exactly is a prepper?”  I’ll excerpt a bit of his explanation here, but suggest you visit his blog, Old Lightning, to read it in its’ entirety.  A big thanks to Tom over at American Preppers Network for pointing me in the direction of YeOldFurt’s post.

So, what is a prepper?  In a nutshell, YeOldFurt says,

Preppers are individuals preparing for personal catastrophic events. These may be extremely personal such as unemployment and meager funds to pay bills and buy groceries, or the events may be widespread due to climate/global catastrophes. They may also include a simple desire to return to living frugally and within their immediate means of support, independent of exterior or governmental support or mandates.

A defining characteristic of preppers, he says, is responsibility.

The great majority of preppers believe in the individual responsibility of self versus the collectivism of government controlled social welfare. Being prepared is an outgrowth of this belief. Some people consider this “conservatism”. Just another label in my opinion. The basis is still individual responsibility for self. No one else, including government, can be or should be responsible for your welfare. Only the individual can provide self-sufficiency for their needs and survival.

To this, I say, “Amen!”  If Katrina taught me nothing else, it taught me that when TSHTF, I have to rely on myself, my family, and what we have done to prepare for that particular crisis.

Prepping doesn’t control my life nor has it become the center of our family activities.  Rather, it’s something I keep in mind as I go about my daily routine.  I look for ways to become better educated and trained for emergencies, and yes, I’m constantly adding cans of corn and bottles of shampoo to my stash!

If the idea of prepping, or preparedness, is new to you, check out my posts in Preparedness 101.  You can prepare yourself and your family for uncertain times without even owning a stitch of cammo clothing!  And even better?  You don’t have to worry about whether or not you belong to the “cool” clique or not!

There may be links in the post above that are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission, which does not affect the price you pay for the product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. 

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I'm the original Survival Mom, and have been helping moms worry less and enjoy their homes and families more for 5 years. Come join me on my journey to becoming more prepared to handle everyday emergencies and worst case scenarios.

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